R is for Rhys

Standard

r

It’s April, and that means it’s time for the A to Z challenge. I really must be a glutton for punishment; April is my last month of college, and I’m still an amateur blogger, but I must say, I’m looking forward to the challenge. I’m going to be writing short little blurbs about some retired characters from my DISTANT past up until recently; all of them are failed concepts. Part of me is hoping that writing about these characters will inspire me…perhaps to write more during the summer when school is out.

Behold! It’s time for more twins. As I mentioned earlier in this challenge, I’m obsessed with twins, particularly fraternal twins. We’re going to go on a little trip down memory lane. When I was in junior high, I wanted a twin brother so badly that I made one up. A long lost twin. His name was Rhys, and he went to a boarding school in Boston, living a hopelessly extravagant life I would never grasp because he was the “smart” one. I actually don’t remember a lot of details about him, but apparently, he was so vivid a character that my friend developed a crush on him. …and then I killed him in a train accident. I was a terrible person.

But naturally, I had so much fun with this that I had to create a tragic twin brother for a character you’ll see later in this challenge. Rhys Hawk is the long-lost son of Lance Hawk. (Remember him from earlier?) You see, he had twins, but one of them was kidnapped by some enemies. Rhys grew up in another mercenary camp. Honestly, nothing bad happened to him. He was just separated from his family. Trouble doesn’t start until his twin sister gets kidnapped by the same group, and they meet for the first time.

Rhys himself is a voice of reason. He’s calm and gentle, not really much of a fighter, but he is also incredibly passive, so if his adoptive father tells him to do something, he’ll do it. This becomes a source of conflict for him.

But really…a long lost twin brother? I think soap operas have done that before. Rhys ended up becoming a major problem for me. He just made my plots way too complicated. I tried time and time again to fix the trouble he had caused, but I could never really find a way to revive my childish interest in my own imaginary twin brother.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s